Science

now browsing by category

 

Universe as a Hologram

In 1997, the theoretical physicist Juan Maldacena proposed a bold model of the universe in which gravity, thin infinitesimal vibrating strings could be reinterpreted in terms of well-established physic’s. The mathematically complex world of chains, which exist in nine spatial dimensions plus one time, could just be a hologram: the real action unfold over a simpler, flatter cosmos where there is no gravity.

 

(reBloged)

Killing your plants with your Wifi Router

Are your houseplants slowly dieing? Maybe! But there may be another reason (other than negligence) why all are yellow and wilty: its from your Wi-Fi router.

An experiment conducted by a group of high school students in Denmark has sparked some serious international interest in the scientific community.

 

(reBloged)

Scientists snap picture of immune system

Scientists snap picture of immune system

Powerful enough to capture a single molecule microscope has taken the clearest picture yet of the immune system in action.

The technique, called super-resolution single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, recently helped scientists at the University of Manchester in England track natural killer (NK) cells, which help destroy cancer and viruses.

 

(reBloged)

Stomatch Biological Clock

Certain nerves in the stomach act as a kind of biological clock, which may help dampen appetite at night and allow heartier eating during the day, researchers have found.

The results may help shed some light on why shift workers are at high risk of conditions like obesity and diabetes, they say.

(reBloged)
 

Bionic Hand

Simple tasks, like plucking the stem off a cherry, are still monumental challenges for artificial hands. With a bill of materials perhaps a few hundred components long, it is not surprising that their functionality is low compared with one assembled from trillions of components. A new prosthetic bionic hand, designed and built by researchers at Case Western University is now capable of using measurements from 20 sensor points to control the grip force of its digits. Incredibly, the sensor data is linked directly to the sensory nerves in the patient’s forearm. The control for the grip closure is then extracted myoelectrically from the normal biological return loop to the muscles in the forearm.

(reBloged)
 

Vitamin D keeps your brain healthy

Getting enough vitamin D may keep your brain healthy.

www.frontview.org

Getting enough vitamin D may not just be good for your bone health; it may keep your brain healthy as well. The researchers also found that the rats who were vitamin D deficient had significantly higher levels of several other brain proteins, which potentially contributed to significant nitrosative stress in the brain.

 

 
(reBlog)
 

 

 

Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian Cancer research has come along way. Wouldn’t it be nice if you could have a more accurate information on how to treat this deadly disease?

www.frontview.org

A sensitive new DNA test can predict how long ovarian cancer patients will survive, and guide personalized treatment decisions, according to new research.

 

 
(reBloged)
 

Body parts grown from stem cells

The list of body parts grown from stem cells is getting longer and longer.

www.frontview.org

A team of European scientists has grown parts of a human brain in tissue culture from stem cells. Their work could help scientists understand the origins of schizophrenia or autism and lead to drugs to treat them, said Juergen Knoblich, deputy scientific director at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and one of the paper’s co-authors.

 

 
(reBloged)
 

 

 

DNA Finally Photographed!

DNA is finally photographed, after all these years they are able to take a picture of the building blocks of life.

www.frontview.org

Fifty-nine years after James Watson and Francis Crick deduced the double-helix structure of DNA, a scientist has captured the first direct photograph of the twisted ladder that props up life. Enzo Di Fabrizio, a physics professor at Magna Graecia University in Catanzaro, Italy, snapped the picture using an electron microscope. 

 

 
(reBloged)
 

 

 

GPU Renders Passwords Useless

Think that your eight-character password consisting of lowercase characters, uppercase characters and a sprinkling of numbers is strong enough to protect you from a brute force attack? Think again!

www.frontview.org

Jon Honeyball writing for PC Pro has a sobering piece on how the modern GPU can be leveraged as a powerful tool against passwords once considered safe from brute force attack.

 


(reBloged)